Books of Hours

<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=50&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=BRMS+14">BRMS 14</a>

Book of Hours. Use of Rome.
Florence or Fiesole, ca. 1480.
Illuminated manuscript on vellum. (BRMS 14)

The most popular text genre of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, the Book of Hours was designed for private Christian devotion to be followed several times each day. Comprised of Latin prayers, psalms, and other texts excerpted from the liturgy of the cloistered religious, these texts were also specifically supplemented with regional and even personal preferences of the lay reader. The essential components included the Calendar of Christian feast days; the Hours of the Virgin Mary, to be recited during the eight canonical hours of the day; the Seven Penitential Psalms; the Litany of saints; the Office of the Dead, for the commendation of deceased souls; and the Suffrages of the saints. Additional prayers focused specifically on the Virgin Mary or favorite local saints.

Books of Hours