Manuscripts in the Age of Print

<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=50&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=BRMS+167">BRMS 167</a>

Matthias Joseph Gerzabeck (fl. 1775).
Himlischer Weeg-Weiser oder Auserlösene krafftig und anmüthige Gebetter.
1775. Manuscript on paper with calligraphic flourishes, signed and dated 1 October 1775 by Matthias Joseph Gerzabeck, with engraved frontispiece and 12 engraved devotional plates by Franz Heissig. (BRMS 167)

The continuing creation and use of manuscripts when printed texts and images became widely available can be seen throughout this exhibition: three quarters of the items on display were produced after 1450. This final section highlights intriguing aspects of manuscripts in the age of print including volumes in which manuscripts were bound with printed texts and images in various combinations. These include fifteenth-century and sixteenth-century hybrid books which combine manuscript and printed texts and eighteenth-century manuscripts illustrated with engraved plates. The show concludes with a nineteenth-century gift book with minutely inscribed words which exemplifies the influence of both the printed page and engraved letter forms on later manuscript production.

Manuscripts in the Age of Print